Weimaraner Coat Colors: 12 Known Colors

Do you know the weimaraner coat colors? This article covers all of the twelve known weimaraner colors.

Weimaraners come in twelve recognized colors: gray (also known as silver or platinum), blue, black, liver (also known as brown), yellow and white. If you’re lucky, your weim might even be “bicolor,” which means he has some color on top with a lighter shade of the same color underneath.

Weims are either rough (with a somewhat harsh outer coat) or smooth (with a soft, dense undercoat). Some weims have tricolor coats — with two colors on top and another color underneath. But there’s no “dapple” pattern in the breed.

But generally, there are three basic coat colo(u)rs – blue, grey, and silver grey.

To know more about it, read on.

Weimaraner Coat Colors: Grey

Weimaraner Coat Colors: Grey

Grey weimaraners are the most common. They range in color from light silver to dark gun-metal grey. Most have distinct rust markings on their faces, ears, legs, and chest. The rust markings often fade with the body of the dog, but in some cases, continue to grow darker until it is difficult or impossible to distinguish between where the rust ends and the base coat begins. This color is also pretty common for similar weimaraner’s dogs.

At birth, all weimaraners are black with large white areas on their chests and feet. Their coat color changes very quickly after birth; some pups go from solid black through various shades of grey to their adult coloration in as little as four weeks.

The ideal shade of grey is unique for each pup. It influences by sunlight exposure, temperature, age, and other factors. A newly changed weimaraner might resemble a german shorthaired pointer or even an irish setter. As the pup gets older, his coat should darken into a deep grey. It should be one or two shades lighter than their parents’ coats.

An interesting fact about weimaraner’s grey coat color is that it fades to white with old age. Rather than darkening like most other dog colors. It has been reported that some weimaraners can be “grayed” entirely in as little as 3-4 years.

Light Grey (Silver):

Light Grey (Silver):

Light grey weimaraners are the lightest shade of grey. They range in color from white to silver and may have little or no rust markings on their coats.

Dark Grey (Gun-Metal):

Dark Grey (Gun-Metal):

Darker shades of grey range from black to gunmetal (charcoal). Most dark grey weimaraners possess distinct rust markings that are similar in color to their lighter cousins. But can be distinguished much easier.

Isabella Grey:

Isabella Grey:

Isabella-colored weimaraners have a base coat that is cream-colored rather than grey. Their coats are much lighter than other weimaraners and may not possess any visible rust areas at all.

Weimaraner Coat Colors: Blue

Weimaraner Coat Colors: Blue

Blue weimaraners are the second most common coat color. They range in color from light silver to dark steel with rust markings similar to that of the grey pups, but blue dogs typically do not have as much overall rust coloring.

Blue is dilute of grey and has little or no black masking on their faces. However, some blue weimaraners may have black areas on their ears, muzzles, chests, and backs.

Blue is a dominant trait and is an acceptable color in the show ring. In fact, weimaraners which are both blue and silver as pups can be shown as blues as adults as long as they have some rust markings on their backs.

In order to avoid skin problems associated with dilutes such as blue, grey, or lavender, it is recommended that blue dogs not be bred to blue dogs or other dilute colors.

Light Blue:

Light Blue:

The lightest shade of blue is called light blue, and it can be very difficult to distinguish from grey. Light blues often look like a dirty cream color when the coat first starts growing in. The gray undercoat shows through for several months before all the coat grows in as blue.

Light blue pups usually do not have much rust coloring. They are often born with black markings on their ears, but may completely shed these marks as they grow up.

Medium Blue:

Medium Blue:

The second shade of blue is called medium blue. This color is also on the lighter side, and it can be very difficult to distinguish from grey. However, there are usually small rust markings around the eyes, mouth, and ears.

Medium blues have a mix of blue and grey in their coats which provides them with more overall color than light blues. As pups, medium blues often have black markings on their ears that eventually wear off as they get older.

Dark Steel Blue:

Dark Steel Blue:

The darkest shade of blue is called dark steel blue. It can be very difficult to distinguish from black. The undercoat is gray and the topcoat is dark steel blue. The masking over the eyes, muzzle, ears, chest, and legs can be either black or rust depending on the dog’s genotype (genetic makeup).

Rare Weimaraner Colors: Piebald

Rare Weimaraner Colors: Piebald

In the weimaraner coat colors, the piebald weimaraners have a base coat that is white, rather than grey. They can be either light or dark in color and often have a few rust-colored markings on them that are usually concentrated around the neck, chest, and stomach areas. All pied dogs should have large amounts of white on their faces as well as on their paws, chests, stomachs, and legs. Piebald is an extremely rare coat color in the weimaraner breed.

Red Weimaraner Coat Colors

red Weimaraner

There are only a couple of known red weimaraners in the world. Most breeders believe that caused by black and liver genes cause this color, although no one knows for sure since red weimaraners are so rare. The dogs can range from very light cream to dark chocolate in color. They must possess some rust areas, though these can be very small.

Red is a dominant trait, you should not breed it with blue. It also masks black, so you should again avoid breeding it with this color.

Also Read:

Weimaraner Blue Eyes: Myth or Truth?
Piebald Weimaraner: Temperament, Facts & Care Guide
Weimaraner Colors: Which Colors Do They Get

Which Coat Color Should I Choose?

If you are interested in showing your weimaraner, then the color and markings must conform to the breed standard. Your breeder can help match with a puppy that will be showable with its adult coloring. Or, you may want to buy an older dog from previous breeding.

If show rings are not in your future, then you can choose any weimaraner puppy you like, as long as it is healthy. Since the breed has so many different colors and markings anyway, there is sure to be one in your local kennel club that will match your personality.

If you do not plan on showing your dog but still want a companion, you should look at the dog’s health and temperament instead of its color. A healthy, well-socialized weimaraner is going to make a better pet than a sickly one with poor coloring — no matter what the shade may be.

Conclusion:

The weimaraner coat color is one of the most unique in all of dogdom. The breed has three different acceptable colors to choose from, each with its own set of beautiful markings that are quite distinct to the eye. There are also several very rare, but beautiful colors for you to choose from if you so desire.

You can choose any weimaraner puppy you like, as long as it is healthy. Since the breed has so many different colors and markings anyway, there is sure to be one in your local kennel club that will match your personality.

A healthy, well-socialized weimaraner is going to make a better pet than a sickly one with poor coloring — no matter what the shade may be.

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